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Olivier Dorrell returns to guide us through an immensely important subject to collectors and re-enactors. A separate lining system had many advantages. Being light weighted it could be used without the steel shell for guard or ceremonial duties, whilst the shell itself could also double up as a wash basin in the Field. Brought into service in the M1 liner underwent a variety of design and material changes over its service life, with the most important developments happening during the Second World War. The first liners were from the Hawley company.

The liner is made from many parts. The outer part is shaped to fit snugly into the steel shell.

WWII-Era M1 Helmets: A Beginner's Guide

The various elements of the suspension system are riveted, later clipped, inside it. The suspension is made from strips of webbing material stretching around and across the inside of the liner.

Aug 25,   Now that you are familiar with the steel M1 helmet shell, you will need to find a liner. In early McCord tasked Hawley Products Co. of St. Charles, Illinois to produce a suitable liner for its steel helmet. The temporary solution was a liner that consisted of two rigid fiber shells cemented together, impregnated with water resistant chemicals, covered with olive drab fabric, and outfitted. May 02,   Im having LOTS of trouble dating it due to a lack of markings. The only marking on the pot is on the chinstrap. Looks like is has a stainless steel rim so the shell is WW2 with 80's chinstraps if the camo cover was dated 83 it was probably woodland camo and not a mitchell cover. Help Identifying Year of an M1 Helmet Theme. The M1 helmet is a combat helmet that was used by the United States military from World War II until , when it was succeeded by the PASGT butterfishny.com over forty years, the M1 was standard issue for the U.S. military. The M1 helmet has become an icon of the American military, with its design inspiring other militaries around the butterfishny.com: Combat helmet.

A sweatband is mounted onto these, which is adjusted to fit around the head of the wearer. The liner chinstrap is snapped or riveted directly to the inside of the liner and does not have bails like the shell chinstrap, but it still swivels inside the helmet.

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The liner chinstrap is usually seen looped over the brim of the shell and helps to keep the shell in place when its own chinstraps aren't in use.

The first liners were made from compressed paper fibers impregnated with phenolic resinbut were quickly eliminated, because they degraded quickly in high humidity environments and were replaced by constantly evolving plastic liners. During the same period, the original silver Rayon suspension material was phased out in favor of khaki cotton.

These liners differ in that color of the HBT webbing was changed from khaki or Olive Drab 3 to a darker green color known as Olive Drab 7. Much later, liners switched to using stronger synthetic webbing and had improved neck support. In the s, the M1 helmet liner was redesigned, eliminating the leather chin strap, nape strap and a change in the suspension webbing to a pattern resembling an asterisk in a coarse cotton web material in lieu of the earlier herringbone twill.

In the early s, materials changed to a thicker, more flexible nylon with a rougher unbeveled rim.

The M1 helmet is a combat helmet that was used by the United States military from World War II until , when it was succeeded by the PASGT helmet. For over forty years, the M1 was standard issue for the U.S. military. The M1 helmet has become an icon of the American military, with its design inspiring other militaries around the world. The M1 helmet is extremely popular with militaria. "What's the heat lot number in that helmet?" If I had a dime for every time I have to answer that question. So much importance & significance has been placed on the alpha numeric code in the brim of the m1 helmet. Maybe it is the sheer number of helmets I've had pass through my hands, but I don't place a great amount of importance on these codes. Nevertheless I began to notice this trend. Due to this we are merely choosing to touch on the basics of what to look out for when identifying and dating an M1 helmet to the Second World War. The M1 is indeed an iconic helmet seeing service with the US military from the early s up until its replacement by the "Fritz" or .

Later changes included a move to a yellow and green material for liner construction. Around late or earlythe United States Marine Corps used a cloth camouflage-patterned helmet cover for its helmets.

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The cover was made from herringbone twill fabric. It had a " forest green " pattern on one side and a "brown coral island" pattern on the other. The United States Army often utilized nets to reduce the helmets' shine when wet and to allow burlap scrim or vegetation to be added for camouflage purposes. Most nets were acquired from British or Canadian Army stocks or cut from larger camouflage nets, The Army did not adopt an official issue net until the M mesh net that included a neoprene foliage band, which would have been retained on latter Mitchell and woodland camouflage covers.

After World War II, various styles of camouflage cover were used at different times.

Worldwide Auctioneers to offer up WWII Collection

In the s through s, the type commonly seen in the United States Army and Marine Corps was a reversible fabric cover called the Mitchell Pattern. This type was nearly omnipresent in Vietnamand where, for the first time, the army wore the cloth camouflage as general issue; whereas in World War II and the Korean War, the army traditionally wore their helmets only with nets, or just plain, without anything on it.

In Vietnam, the green portion of the reversible fabric camouflage was normally worn outermost. Helmet covers in the European woodland camouflagewere designed for fighting in the European Theater of Operations NATOand became the post-Vietnam jungle pattern camouflage cover used by the U. The European Woodland pattern was not reversible; they were only printed on one side. These covers were all constructed from two semi-circular pieces of cloth stitched together to form a dome-like shape conforming to the helmet's shape.

#N#Dating the M1 Steel Helmet. By Scott Robinson. #N#Swivel/Flexible. Stainless Steel. #N#Sand/Silica all post war. To be considered a WWII helmet, the helmet in question must possess all original manufacturing techniques and parts dating from the first approved production models in to the last WWII specifications in If any post changes are present in any part of the helmet, then it cannot be considered a true WWII helmet. The M1 helmet was a unique and practical solution, compared to its contemporaries. A separate lining system had many advantages. Being light weighted it could be used without the steel shell for guard or ceremonial duties, whilst the shell itself could also double up as a wash basin in the Field.

They were secured to the helmet by folding their open ends into the steel pot, and then placing the liner inside, trapping the cloth between the pot and the liner. An olive green elastic band, intended to hold additional camouflage materials, was often worn around the helmet to further hold the cover in place.

Other armies used these or similar covers printed with different camouflage patterns, or employed entirely different methods. In the Dutch Armyfor example, it was common practice to use a square piece of burlap as a helmet cover on M1 helmets, usually secured by a net see above and a wide rubber band.

During the Battle of the Bulge and Korean War, soldiers made white helmet covers as camouflage in snowy areas. They were not issued to soldiers, so many soldiers simply made them from a white cloth from a shirt. The first derivation of the M1 was to provide cut-outs so that it would fit over the earphones of the flying helmet.

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When extra metal plates were added to cover the earphones, the result was the M3. Larger ear plates and no flared lip to the helmet gave the M5.

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The U. Navy adopted the M1 helmet as protection for its gunners, particularly those engaged in anti-aircraft weapons operation due to the expectation that gunners would be exposed to hostile machine gun fire from attacking aircraft, ordnance, as well as falling shrapnel from their own anti-aircraft fire. Such helmets were typically painted the same shade of blue, grey, or red denoting damage control on naval vessels.

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A Nepalese UN soldier wearing M1 helmet in The Dutch and Austrians, in particular, were very prolific in creating these clone helmets. Many speculate that adoption of the M1 style of helmet was due to the negative aura that surrounded the Stahlhelmin addition to other more practical reasons.

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For reenactors with a budget and movie sets, these clone helmets are a very viable alternative to original front-seam helmets. Because of this, they are a resource that has yet to be tapped into by World War II enthusiasts. However, the shape of these helmets is slightly different than the World War II and Korean War vintage M1, and a trained eye can tell the difference. The visor in the front is also larger and the rim flares out more.

During the First Indochina Warthe U. The M1 was used by the Canadian Army from toalthough M1 Helmets had been used in limited numbers by Canadian Forces as early as Canadian troops participating in the invasion of Kiska in the Aleutian Islands during wore US M1 helmets to avoid friendly fire incidents with US troops also participating in the operation.

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Israel Defence Forces made extensive use of the M1 in its original form as well as ating the design with a 3-point chinstrap from the s onward. The United Nations Peacekeeping Force still issues the M1 helmet, painted sky blue, on peacekeeping missions. They are slowly being replaced by more modern helmets made of kevlar.

Sign In Don't have an account? Contents [ show ]. Maybe it is the sheer number of helmets I've had pass through my hands, but I don't place a great amount of importance on these codes. Nevertheless I began to notice this trend in the helmet community of cataloging heat numbers.

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Using them to date a helmet. Using them to discredit a helmet. Using them in auction descriptions to squeeze a better ending price. Or the worst, grinding away the paint in a helmet to make them clearly visible.

Ww2 m1 helmet dating

Picking up on this trend I started a dialogue with my friend Marc. We would have extensive discussions about "numbers and letters", so to speak.

Why are they there? We knew a little. Not a lot.

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Can they effectively date a helmet? When were they stamped into the helmet?

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At the foundry or pressing plant? Is there a way to break the code? After awhile it grew into a great interest for him. I encourage you to read the article.

The Basics on Dating a US M1 Helmet



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3 thoughts on “Ww2 m1 helmet dating

  1. I can not participate now in discussion - it is very occupied. I will return - I will necessarily express the opinion on this question.

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